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Unit of competency details

CHCMHS010 - Implement recovery oriented approaches to complexity (Release 1)

Summary

Usage recommendation:
Current
Release Status:
Current
Releases:
ReleaseRelease date
1 1 (this release) 06/Aug/2015


Classifications

SchemeCodeClassification value
ASCED Module/Unit of Competency Field of Education Identifier 061309 Community Health  

Classification history

SchemeCodeClassification valueStart dateEnd date
ASCED Module/Unit of Competency Field of Education Identifier 061309 Community Health  02/Nov/2015 
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Unit Of competency

Modification History

Release 

Comments 

Release 1

This version was released in CHC Community Services Training Package release 2.0 and meets the requirements of the 2012 Standards for Training Packages.

New unit.

Application

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to identify and respond to issues of complexity when supporting people living with mental illness and their care networks. The unit is based on a strengths-based approach and acknowledges that complexity is not a characteristic of an individual. Complexity may be impacted by a range of interactions between the worker, the organisation and the environmental context.

This unit applies to work with people living with mental illness in a range of community services work contexts.

The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

Elements and Performance Criteria

ELEMENT 

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA 

Elements define the essential outcomes

Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement of the element.

1. Identify the person’s issues that may contribute to complexity

1.1 Invite the person to share their life experience, values, hopes, expectations and needs

1.2 Respond sensitively and warmly and exchange information with the person to assist in facilitating understanding of issues and establish rapport

1.3 Identify with the person the breadth of issues they are facing and any associated or impacting factors

1.4 Listen actively to ensure experiences are heard to support exploration and validation of issues raised

1.5 Engage in collaborative record keeping and ongoing consent

2. Identify worker or service issues that may affect capacity to work with the person

2.1 Identify strengths and limitations of worker and their expertise and experience in dealing with the person’s circumstances

2.2 Discuss the compatibility of the service approach to the persons values and preferences to facilitate real choice

2.3 Identify systemic and personal issues and challenges and report according to organisation procedures

3. Identify environmental issues that may contribute to complexity

3.1 Identify any limitations relating to geographical location and isolation

3.2 Identify extent of the person’s social and support network and any indications of social exclusion or inclusion

3.3 Identify current policies, at a state and federal level and any funding limitations or criteria

3.4 Identify differences in other service practice environments and compatibility to the persons preferences

4. Work collaboratively to prioritise needs and develop self-determined directions

4.1 Seek agreement on the process for prioritising needs

4.2 Prioritise needs and hopes in collaboration with the person

4.3 Agree on options, directions and timelines

4.4 In conjunction with the person, explore risks, opportunities and strategies

4.5 Identify other members of their support network, other services or professionals they wish to involve

4.6 Develop and agree on contingency plans as necessary

4.7 Respond flexibly to the changing needs and circumstances of the person

4.8 Provide and negotiate flexible responses in service provision

5. Coordinate and negotiate recovery oriented service

5.1 Establish, expand and maintain partnerships and support networks to meet the persons needs and create sustainable service pathways

5.2 Work effectively with colleagues, and partner organisations to integrate any existing service provision

5.3 Create supportive and collaborative partnerships with carers, family, friends and community supports

5.4 Collect, review and maintain information on local community services and supports, and share and engage in knowledge exchange

5.5 Use outcomes measures and feedback to ensure the persons needs are being met by contributing services and natural supports

5.6 Continually utilise a range of strategies to actively inspire and foster the persons ongoing involvement

5.7 Proactively respond to support and service gaps both internally and externally

5.8 Proactively and consistently follow up with the person and gather feedback about service provision

6. Address challenges to communication and relationships

6.1 Communicate clearly, honestly and transparently to develop and maintain trusting relationships

6.2 Adapt the communication style and language to meet the needs of others, identifying and addressing any barriers

6.3 Adapt to changing circumstances and respond to the reactions and feedback of others, including responding to person in distress or crisis

6.4 Proactively anticipate change and utilise advanced negotiation skills to address challenges and resolve systemic issues

6.5 Respond to de-escalate potential incidents or risks and promote safety

6.6 Promote and support self advocacy

7. Review and reflect on practice

7.1 Reflect on own work practice and identify areas for improvement

7.2 Seek and use feedback from others as the basis for improving approaches to working with complexity

Foundation Skills

The Foundation Skills described those required skills (language, literacy and numeracy) that are essential to performance.

Foundation skills essential to performance are explicit in the performance criteria of this unit of competency.

Unit Mapping Information

No equivalent unit.

Links

Companion Volume implementation guides are found in VETNet - https://vetnet.gov.au/Pages/TrainingDocs.aspx?q=5e0c25cc-3d9d-4b43-80d3-bd22cc4f1e53

 

Assessment requirements

Modification History

Release 

Comments 

Release 1

This version was released in CHC Community Services Training Package release 2.0 and meets the requirements of the 2012 Standards for Training Packages.

New unit.

Performance Evidence

The candidate must show evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the job role. There must be evidence that the candidate has:

  • performed the activities outlined in the performance criteria of this unit during a period of 160 hours of work worked collaboratively with at least 3 different people with mental illness, and as relevant, their support network, to develop and implement a recovery plan
  • worked with at least 4 of the following complexity issues with those people:
  • alcohol and other drugs (AOD)
  • gambling
  • torture
  • grief and loss
  • disability
  • family violence
  • child protection
  • justice system
  • social housing/homelessness

Knowledge Evidence

The candidate must be able to demonstrate essential knowledge required to effectively do the task outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage the task and manage contingencies in the context of the work role. This includes knowledge of:

  • legal and ethical considerations (international, national, state/territory and local) for addressing complexity in mental health work, and how these are applied in organisations and individual practice:
  • codes of practice
  • continuing professional education
  • discrimination
  • dignity of risk
  • duty of care
  • human rights
  • informed consent
  • mandatory reporting
  • practice standards
  • privacy, confidentiality and disclosure
  • policy frameworks
  • records management
  • rights and responsibilities of workers, employers and individuals accessing the service
  • specific mental health legislation and its impact on individual workers
  • work role boundaries – responsibilities and limitations
  • work health and safety
  • values and principles of the mental health sector, including:
  • recovery
  • recovery oriented practice
  • health promotion and prevention
  • holistic approach
  • empowerment/disempowerment
  • access and equity
  • early intervention
  • rights
  • social justice and inclusion
  • citizenship
  • advocacy and promotion and support of self advocacy strength based practice
  • factors that contribute to complexity and the service delivery models, frameworks and legislation in the following and their links with mental health, including:
  • AOD
  • chronic disease
  • economic circumstance
  • education
  • gambling
  • torture
  • grief and loss
  • disability
  • family violence
  • child protection
  • justice system
  • social housing/homelessness
  • cultural safety considerations
  • techniques for communication and motivational interviewing/counselling, including:
  • active listening
  • attending skills, use of body language, non-verbal communication
  • paraphrasing
  • reflecting feelings
  • open and closed questioning or probing
  • summarising
  • reframing
  • exploring options
  • normalising statements
  • communication techniques required for dealing with complexity:
  • conflict resolution
  • negotiation
  • approaches to practice, including:
  • motivational interviewing
  • solution focused approaches
  • strength based approaches
  • cognitive behavioural approaches
  • narrative approaches
  • acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT)
  • dialectal behavioural therapy
  • reflective practice and its role in underpinning ongoing learning, growth and good practice

Assessment Conditions

Skills must have been demonstrated in the workplace with the addition of simulations and scenarios where the full range of contexts and situations have not been provided in the workplace. Where simulation is used, it must reflect real working conditions by modelling industry operating conditions and contingencies, as well as, using suitable facilities, equipment and resources.

Assessors must satisfy the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) 2015/AQTF mandatory competency requirements for assessors.

Links

Companion Volume implementation guides are found in VETNet - https://vetnet.gov.au/Pages/TrainingDocs.aspx?q=5e0c25cc-3d9d-4b43-80d3-bd22cc4f1e53

Modification History

Release 

Comments 

Release 2

This version was released in CHC Community Services Training Package release 3.0.

Amended modification history and mapping. Equivalent outcome.

Release 1

This version was released in CHC Community Services Training Package release 2.0 and meets the requirements of the 2012 Standards for Training Packages.

Merged CHCCS411C and HLTHIR301C. Significant changes to performance criteria. New evidence requirements for assessment, including volume and frequency requirements. Significant changes to knowledge evidence.

Application

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to communicate effectively with clients, colleagues, management and other industry providers.

This unit applies to a range of health and community service contexts where workers may communicate face-to-face, in writing or using digital media and work with limited responsibility under direct or indirect supervision.

The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

Elements and Performance Criteria

ELEMENT 

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA 

Elements define the essential outcomes

Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement of the element

1. Communicate effectively with people

1.1 Use verbal and non-verbal communication to enhance understanding and demonstrate respect

1.2 Communicate service information in a manner that is clear and easily understood

1.3 Confirm the person’s understanding

1.4 Listen to requests, clarify meaning and respond appropriately

1.5 Exchange information clearly in a timely manner and within confidentiality procedures

2. Collaborate with colleagues

2.1 Listen to, clarify and agree timeframes for carrying out workplace instructions

2.2 Identify lines of communication between organisation and other services

2.3 Use industry terminology correctly in verbal, written and digital communications

2.4 Follow communication protocols that apply to interactions with different people and lines of authority

3. Address constraints to communication

3.1 Identify early signs of potentially complicated or difficult situations and report according to organisation procedures

3.2 Identify actual constraints to effective communication and resolve using appropriate communication strategies and techniques

3.3 Use communication skills to avoid, defuse and resolve conflict situations

4. Report problems to supervisor

4.1 Comply with legal and ethical responsibilities and discuss difficulties with supervisor

4.2 Refer any breach or non adherence to standard procedures or adverse event to appropriate people

4.3 Refer issues impacting on achievement of employee, employer and/or client rights and responsibilities

4.4 Refer unresolved conflict situations to supervisor

5. Complete workplace correspondence and documentation

5.1 Complete documentation according to legal requirement and organisation procedures

5.2 Read workplace documents relating to role and clarify understanding with supervisor

5.3 Complete written and electronic workplace documents to organisation standards

5.4 Follow organisation communication policies and procedures for using digital media

5.5 Use clear, accurate and objective language when documenting events

6. Contribute to continuous improvement

6.1 Contribute to identifying and voicing improvements in work practices

6.2 Promote and model changes to improved work practices and procedures in accordance with organisation requirements

6.3 Seek feedback and advice from appropriate people on areas for skill and knowledge development

6.4 Consult with manager regarding options for accessing skill development opportunities and initiate action

Foundation Skills

The Foundation Skills describe those required skills (language, literacy, numeracy and employment skills) that are essential to performance.

Foundation skills essential to performance are explicit in the performance criteria of this unit of competency.

Unit Mapping Information

No equivalent unit.

Links

Companion Volume implementation guides are found in VETNet - https://vetnet.gov.au/Pages/TrainingDocs.aspx?q=5e0c25cc-3d9d-4b43-80d3-bd22cc4f1e53

Modification History

Not applicable.

Application

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to work with people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with regard for their needs and within the context of support work.

This unit applies to workers in a range of community services contexts who are responsible for their own outputs and are required to use some discretion and judgement. Work may be carried out under direct, indirect or remote supervision.

The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian standards and industry codes of practice.

No occupational licensing, certification or specific legislative requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.

Pre-requisite Unit

Nil

Unit Sector

Client Care and Support

Elements and Performance Criteria

ELEMENTS 

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA 

Elements describe the essential outcomes

Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement of the element.

1. Plan intervention and support activities for people with autism spectrum disorder.

1.1. Read individualised plan to identify the person’s diagnosis and core areas of functional impact.

1.2. Recognise key issues affecting the person with autism spectrum disorder, their carer and family, including siblings.

1.3. Recognise personal values and attitudes to take into account when planning and implementing support activities.

1.4. Determine areas where additional skills and knowledge are required to provide support to the person with autism spectrum disorder according to their individual needs and seek opportunities for professional development.

2. Respond to the needs of people with autism spectrum disorder.

2.1. Work with the person to provide interventions and supports according to the person’s preferences and needs and in line with the individualised plan.

2.2. Implement interventions and support strategies that uphold the needs and rights of the person and support their learning style.

2.3. Support the person’s use of assistive technologies and supports in meeting their individual needs.

2.4. Recognise changes in the needs of the person and report to supervisor or relevant health professional.

2.5. Conduct support activities in a manner that promotes and achieves person-centred outcomes.

3. Operate within a legal and ethical framework and in accordance with the professional standards of the sector.

3.1. Conduct support activities in the context of the underpinning values, philosophies and standards of the sector.

3.2. Work according to organisational policies and procedures relevant to job role and responsibilities.

3.3. Conduct work in a manner according to relevant statutory and legislative requirements.

Foundation Skills

Foundation skills essential to performance are explicit in the Performance Criteria of this unit of competency.

Unit Mapping Information

Supersedes and is not equivalent to CHCCCS024 Support individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

Links

Companion Volume implementation guides are found in VETNet - https://vetnet.gov.au/Pages/TrainingDocs.aspx?q=5e0c25cc-3d9d-4b43-80d3-bd22cc4f1e53