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Unit of competency details

BSBWHS432X - Contribute to organisational mental health response in the context of disruptive events (Release 1)

Summary

Usage recommendation:
Current
Release Status:
Current
Releases:
ReleaseRelease date
1 1 (this release) 23/Jul/2021


Classifications

SchemeCodeClassification value
ASCED Module/Unit of Competency Field of Education Identifier 061301 Occupational Health And Safety  

Classification history

SchemeCodeClassification valueStart dateEnd date
ASCED Module/Unit of Competency Field of Education Identifier 061301 Occupational Health And Safety  15/Sep/2021 
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Unit Of competency

Modification History

Release  

Comments  

Release 1

This version first released with BSB Business Services Training Package Version 7.2.

Application

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to support the mental (or psychological) health of employees in an organisation or work area in the context of a disruptive event. It involves participating in the management of psychological health and safety in the workplace and providing support to others in the event of disruption to an organisation or work area.

This unit applies to those who work in a range of supervisory or managerial roles across all industries, and who apply knowledge of work health and safety (WHS) principles. This unit also applies to health and safety representatives (HSRs).

This unit does not qualify the learner as a mental health professional. For information on delivery, please refer to the Cross-Sector Mental Health and Organisational Disruption Companion Volume Implementation Guide available on VETNet.

No licensing, legislative or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.

NOTES

1. The term ‘mental health’ is defined by the World Health Organization as ‘a state of well-being in which an individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and is able to make a contribution to his or her community’. The terms ‘mental health’ and ‘psychological health’ are equivalent.

2. The term ‘organisational disruption’ refers to the significant disturbance to the operations of an organisation or work area caused by a ‘disruptive event’. Disruptive events may be internal or external to the organisation and may or may not be foreseeable. Examples include: public health risks (such as epidemics and pandemics), natural disasters, public inquiries and litigation.

3. The terms ‘occupational health and safety’ and ‘work health and safety’ are equivalent, and generally either can be used in the workplace. In jurisdictions where model WHS laws have not been implemented, registered training organisations (RTOs) are advised to contextualise this unit of competency by referring to existing WHS legislative requirements.

4. The model WHS laws include the model WHS Act, model WHS Regulations and model WHS Codes of Practice. See Safe Work Australia (SWA) for further information.

Unit Sector

Cross-Sector – Workplace Mental Health

Elements and Performance Criteria

ELEMENT 

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA 

Elements describe the essential outcomes.

Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement of the element.

1. Establish business risk and potential impact in the context of organisational disruption

1.1 Identify internal and external business risks that may contribute to organisational disruption

1.2 Evaluate organisational policies and procedures for addressing internal and external business risks

1.3 Analyse potential disruption to organisation or work area

2. Contribute to managing psychological health and safety in the context of a disruptive event

2.1 Review existing risk register for identified psychological health and safety risks

2.2 Identify new psychosocial hazards and changed psychological risks caused by disruptive event

2.3 Assess severity of risk associated with new psychosocial hazards and changed psychological risks

2.4 Consult with relevant stakeholders and confirm assessment in relation to new psychosocial hazards and changed psychological risks

2.5 Identify and evaluate possible risk control measures according to hierarchy of control

2.6 Contribute to selecting risk control measures according to organisational and legislative requirements

2.7 Support development of a plan for reviewing and evaluating selected risk control measures

3. Contribute to communications and consultation in response to a disruptive event

3.1 Support development of a communications and consultation plan for organisation or work area

3.2 Contribute to processes for ongoing communication and consultation with employees as workplace circumstances evolve

4. Provide support to employees experiencing psychological distress

4.1 Identify signs of psychological distress in employees

4.2 Respond to employees showing signs of psychological distress within the scope of own role and according to organisational policies and procedures

4.3 Refer employees showing signs of psychological distress to support services and resources according to individual needs

4.4 Document support provided according to organisational policies and procedures and legislative requirements

5. Maintain a supportive work environment during organisational disruption

5.1 Support processes for introducing employees to the workplace environment in a physically and psychologically safe manner

5.2 Contribute to implementing reasonable adjustments for employees experiencing psychological injury according to organisational policies and procedures and legislative requirements

5.3 Provide support to employees permanently leaving the organisation within the limits of own role and according to organisational policies and procedures and legislative requirements

Foundation Skills

This section describes those language, literacy, numeracy and employment skills that are essential to performance but not explicit in the performance criteria.

Skill 

Description 

Reading

  • Interprets and critically analyses texts when contributing to work-related psychological health and safety
  • Constructs meaning from texts to assist in promoting work-related psychological health and safety

Oral communication

  • Presents information and opinions using language and non-verbal features appropriate to audience
  • Asks questions and participates in discussions using listening and questioning to elicit views of others and to clarify or confirm understanding
  • Uses appropriate communication styles and techniques when engaging with employees who are experiencing psychological distress

Teamwork

  • Collaborates and consults with others to achieve shared goals in psychological health and safety
  • Adapts personal communication style to build trust and positive working relationships and to show respect for the diverse opinions, values and particular needs of others
  • Uses a variety of strategies to promote effective relationships between team members and to foster a supportive culture

Planning and organising

  • Selects and uses appropriate conventions and protocols when communicating at various levels

Initiative and enterprise

  • Maintains knowledge of legislative requirements and resources that is current and accurate
  • Assesses opportunities to improve organisational policies and procedures to better support psychological health and safety in the workplace

Unit Mapping Information

No equivalent unit. Newly created unit.

Links

Companion Volume Implementation Guides are found on VETNet: - https://vetnet.gov.au/Pages/TrainingDocs.aspx?q=11ef6853-ceed-4ba7-9d87-4da407e23c10

 

Assessment requirements

Modification History

Release  

Comments  

Release 1

This version first released with BSB Business Services Training Package Version 7.2.

Performance Evidence

The candidate must demonstrate the ability to complete the tasks outlined in the elements, performance criteria and foundation skills of this unit, including evidence of the ability to:

  • identify at least one internal and at least one external business risk, and evaluate the organisational policies and procedures for addressing them, including emergency management plan and crisis management plan
  • coordinate a risk assessment process for an organisation or work area in response to at least one disruptive event, and contribute to selecting at least three different risk control measures suited to the response
  • identify at least two different employees showing signs of psychological distress and provide them with support, including advising them of referral options for further support.

In the course of the above, the candidate must apply:

  • legislative requirements applicable to disruptive event
  • obligations in line with roles and responsibilities of stakeholders involved in event.

Knowledge Evidence

The candidate must be able to demonstrate knowledge to complete the tasks outlined in the elements, performance criteria and foundation skills of this unit, including knowledge of:

  • organisational policies and procedures relating to mental health response in disruptive events, including for:
  • assessing risks associated with psychosocial hazards
  • documenting mental health support provided
  • supporting employees permanently leaving the organisation
  • types of internal and external business risks that may contribute to organisational disruption, including:
  • strategic risks
  • compliance risks
  • financial risks
  • operational risks
  • types of organisational disruptive events, including:
  • public health risks, including epidemics and pandemics
  • environmental changes and natural disasters
  • economic and geopolitical disruption
  • operational disruption, including mergers or acquisitions, litigation, operational transformation and technological developments
  • WHS legislation, rights and obligations relating to psychological health and safety in the context of organisational disruption, including:
  • duty of care
  • due diligence
  • privacy and confidentiality
  • difference between hazards, risks and risk controls
  • hierarchy of control measures
  • collective processes and powers, including cease works
  • features of emergency and crisis management plans relevant to psychological health and safety
  • psychosocial hazards relating to organisational disruption, including:
  • exposure to physical hazards and environmental conditions
  • exposure to violence, aggression, traumatic events and discrimination
  • work demands
  • lack of support and isolated work
  • workplace relationships
  • organisational change management
  • non work-related stressors with potential to affect psychological health and safety, including:
  • financial insecurity
  • balancing work and caring responsibilities
  • concern for vulnerable family members and friends
  • change to activities that support psychological health
  • received threats
  • domestic and family violence
  • signs of psychological distress, including:
  • mood and behavioural changes
  • unexplained absence from the workplace
  • changes in social interactions and work participation
  • self-harm, suicidal ideation or suicide attempt
  • workplace mechanisms that support psychological health, including:
  • flexible ways of working, including working remotely and flexible start and finish times
  • providing access to support services and resources, including professional help and personal leave
  • providing access to training for employees
  • methods of accessing resources and support services internally and externally, including:
  • Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs)
  • publications of key bodies, including Safe Work Australia, World Health Organization and Mental Health First Aid
  • strategies and techniques to:
  • manage personal stressors
  • support work-life balance
  • have supportive conversations with employees showing signs of psychological distress
  • create a safe and supportive workplace culture
  • common reasonable adjustments that support an employee with a psychological injury to continue working or return to work, including adjustments relating to:
  • work tasks
  • work hours
  • location of work
  • legislative requirements associated with providing reasonable adjustments, including Fair Work legislation and workers compensation legislation.

Assessment Conditions

Skills in this unit must be demonstrated in a workplace or simulated environment where the conditions are typical of those in a working environment. Real workplace situations should not be used in the assessment where doing so may result in risk to the health and safety of self and/or others.

This includes access to:

  • legislation, and organisational policies and procedures required to demonstrate performance evidence
  • case studies and, where possible, real situations
  • opportunities for interaction with others.

Assessors of this unit must satisfy the requirements for assessors in applicable vocational education and training legislation, frameworks and/or standards.

Assessment must involve persons with current and relevant experience in workplace mental health.

Links

Companion Volume Implementation Guides are found on VETNet: - https://vetnet.gov.au/Pages/TrainingDocs.aspx?q=11ef6853-ceed-4ba7-9d87-4da407e23c10