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Unit of competency details

AHCECR309 - Conduct an ecological and cultural site inspection prior to works (Release 1)

Summary

Usage recommendation:
Current
Release Status:
Current
Releases:
ReleaseRelease date
1 1 (this release) 24/Dec/2020


Classifications

SchemeCodeClassification value
ASCED Module/Unit of Competency Field of Education Identifier 050999 Environmental Studies, N.e.c.  

Classification history

SchemeCodeClassification valueStart dateEnd date
ASCED Module/Unit of Competency Field of Education Identifier 050999 Environmental Studies, N.e.c.  09/Feb/2021 
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Unit of competency

Modification History

Release

Comments

Release 1

This version released with AHC Agriculture, Horticulture and Conservation and Land Management Training Package Version 6.0.

Application

This unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to inspect a site for ecological, biosecurity, cultural and heritage risk and report discrepancies in planned works prior to commencing works.

The unit applies to individuals who work in conservation and land management under broad supervision. They take responsibility for their own work and use discretion and judgement in the selection, allocation and use of available resources.

No licensing, legislative or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.

Pre-requisite Unit

Nil

Unit Sector

Ecological Restoration (ECR)

Elements and Performance Criteria

Elements

Performance Criteria

Elements describe the essential outcomes.

Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement of the element.

1. Define and confirm location and setting

1.1 Confirm location and proposed activities/works with supervisor, plans and specifications

1.2 Identify legislation, regulations and agreements that affect aspects of the location and planned work

1.3 Identify key stakeholders, partners and other stakeholders

1.4 Confirm permits and licences required with supervisor

2. Determine impact of work on ecosystem and landscape

2.1 Inspect location and identify biotic and abiotic elements impacted by planned work

2.2 Identify and locate communities and species that are subject to legal protection

2.3 Identify biotic and abiotic elements, and ecological functions and processes that vary from plans

2.4 Identify threats to biotic and abiotic elements

2.5 Identify risks of activity/work breaching legislative requirements

2.6 Identify risk to ecosystem and landscape elements, functions, processes, and legal obligations, and report concerns to supervisor for direction

2.7 Record changed conditions and risk

3. Determine impact of work on culture and heritage

3.1 Identify known cultural and heritage considerations from plans and other documentation, and confirm these with supervisor or cultural advisor

3.2 Confirm workplace procedure for responding to new cultural and heritage discoveries during work

3.3 Locate known cultural and heritage features and boundaries in the field

3.4 Confirm field observations against plans and specifications

3.5 Identify and record potential threat to culture and heritage from work, and report this to supervisor

4. Determine biosecurity implications of work

4.1 Identify biosecurity hazards and threats for site

4.2 Inspect site and identify and record previously reported biosecurity hazards and threats

4.3 Identify and record new or unreported biosecurity threats

4.4 Identify and locate species on site that are subject to legislative requirements

4.5 Identify and record actions to mitigate biosecurity risk

5. Report identified risks and threats

5.1 Compile identified risks and threats according to workplace procedures

5.2 Report risks and threats to supervisor for determinations and action

Foundation Skills

This section describes those language, literacy, numeracy and employment skills that are essential for performance in this unit of competency but are not explicit in the performance criteria.

Skill

Description

Reading

  • Interpret site plans and specifications for site works, and reconcile against actual site conditions

Writing

  • Prepare records and reports accurately and succinctly using standard industry terminology

Unit Mapping Information

Code and title current version

Code and title previous version

Comments

Equivalence status

AHCECR309 Conduct an ecological and cultural site inspection prior to works

Not applicable

The unit has been created to address a skill or task required by industry that is not covered by an existing unit

Newly created

Links

Companion Volumes, including Implementation Guides, are available at VETNet: - https://vetnet.gov.au/Pages/TrainingDocs.aspx?q=c6399549-9c62-4a5e-bf1a-524b2322cf72

 

Assessment requirements

Modification History

Release

Comments

Release 1

This version released with AHC Agriculture, Horticulture and Conservation and Land Management Training Package Version 6.0.

Performance Evidence

An individual demonstrating competency must satisfy all of the elements and performance criteria in this unit.

There must be evidence that the individual has, on at least one occasion, conducted a site inspection for impact of works on ecological, cultural or heritage assets on a site, and has:

  • confirmed site location and proposed works with supervisor, plans and specifications
  • identified key stakeholders, partners and other interested parties
  • identified biotic and abiotic elements, including:
  • annual rainfall and dominant weather patterns
  • gradient, drainage, and local base levels
  • landform, soil type and native topsoil condition
  • native vegetation types and classification
  • altered native vegetation and classification systems that apply
  • presence or signs of native fauna
  • apex predators and keystone species
  • key habitat features
  • identified and located protected elements, including at least three of the following:
  • threatened rare or priority taxa
  • threatened ecological communities
  • clearing of native vegetation
  • stormwater flows and containment
  • registered cultural or heritage sites
  • declared pest and weed species
  • identified and assessed the impact of proposed work on biotic and abiotic elements
  • identified previously recorded culture and heritage values
  • located known cultural and heritage assets and boundaries on site
  • identified and assessed the impact of works on cultural and heritage values
  • identified and recorded biosecurity hazards and threats
  • inspected site for biosecurity threats
  • reconciled landscape, ecological, cultural and biosecurity field observations against recorded or reported documentation
  • identified threats posed by works
  • compiled risks and threats and reported to supervisor for determination.

Knowledge Evidence

An individual must be able to demonstrate the knowledge required to perform the tasks outlined in the elements and performance criteria of this unit. This includes knowledge of:

  • maps, plans, Global Positioning System (GPS) and basic spatial methods
  • relevant legislation, regulations, agreements, permits and licences relating to:
  • threatened rare or priority taxa
  • threatened ecological communities
  • clearing of native vegetation
  • stormwater flows and containment
  • registered cultural or heritage sites
  • declared pest and weed species
  • stakeholder groups and consultation processes
  • workplace procedure for interactions with stakeholders and the media
  • foundation ecological principles for native ecosystems, including:
  • physical aspects – biotic and abiotic factors
  • ecological functions and processes, including energy transfer and major nutrient flows
  • major ecosystem properties, including trophic levels, resource availability and population dynamics
  • ecosystem services, and the value of terrestrial and aquatic native ecosystems to humans
  • common forms of damage to biotic and abiotic factors, ecosystem functions and processes
  • animal habitat features and impacts on both native and feral species, including water points, thickets, undergrowth, perches and tree hollows
  • altered native vegetation, including regrowth or rangeland
  • abiotic elements both physical and chemical affecting ecosystems, including:
  • climate – rainfall, wind, temperature, regular and episodic changes and patterns, including seasons, floods and drought
  • terrain, relief, aspect and altitude
  • drainage principles, including catchments, gradients and base levels
  • geology, soil type and chemical properties, including, salt, nutrients and pH
  • processes of erosion – wind, water, chemical, heat and mass movement
  • pollution of waterbodies
  • long-term changes and trends, including climate change
  • biotic elements in the ecosystem, including:
  • native and introduced plants and their vegetation classification
  • native and introduced animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates
  • microorganisms and their role in the environment
  • important landscape habitat features for native fauna
  • major threats and causes of degradation to native ecosystems, including the role of local industries, (including at least one of primary production, landscaping, mining or tourism)
  • sources and effects of pollution on ecosystems
  • value of remnant vegetation, topsoil and original soil profiles in ecological restoration system works
  • common biosecurity threats from pest animals, pest plants and diseases
  • hygiene practices to mitigate biosecurity threats
  • principles of prevention and control of pests and diseases
  • local cultural and heritage values
  • potential incidental cultural and heritage discoveries
  • procedures for responding to incidental cultural and heritage discoveries
  • evaluating risk for ecosystems, biosecurity, culture and heritage.

Assessment Conditions

Assessment of the skills in this unit of competency must take place under the following conditions:

  • physical conditions:
  • skills must be demonstrated in the field
  • specifications:
  • site-specific plans and maps for work
  • work plans detailing current biosecurity threats, and cultural and heritage assets
  • legislation, regulations and agreements
  • correct resources, equipment and materials
  • relationships:
  • supervisor
  • stakeholders.

Assessors of this unit must satisfy the requirements for assessors in applicable vocational education and training legislation, frameworks and/or standards.

Links

Companion Volumes, including Implementation Guides, are available at VETNet: - https://vetnet.gov.au/Pages/TrainingDocs.aspx?q=c6399549-9c62-4a5e-bf1a-524b2322cf72